Showing 38 results

Authority record

Anglican Church Women of Prince Edward Island

  • Canada
  • Corporate body
  • 1897-2017

The following background information is adapted from the Anglican Church of Canada Archives website at https://www.anglican.ca/archives/holdings/fonds/womans-auxiliary-fonds/

The constitution for the Anglican Church Women outlines its mission as follows: "Anglican Church Women of Canada is a loosely knit fellowship of all women of the Anglican Church of Canada and others who agree with and support the purpose of the Anglican Church Women of Canada. The purpose is to give the women of the Anglican Church the opportunity to unite in a fellowship of worship, study and service which will lead them into Christian service in the parish, community, diocese, nation, and world."

The Woman’s Auxiliary was founded in April 1885 “for the promotion of missionary effort”. The first president was Margaret Medley, wife of the Bishop of Fredericton and Archbishop of the Province of Canada. Roberta E. Tilton of Ottawa was the major force in organizing both diocesan and parochial branches and in promoting the affiliation of existing groups and societies.

The “Letter Leaflet” was a monthly publication first produced in the Diocese of Toronto. It expanded and became the W.A.’s official publication and in 1923 it was renamed “The Living Message”.

The W.A. was reorganized in 1908 following the founding of the Missionary Society of the Church of England in Canada (MSCC) to conform to the structure of General Synod. Caroline M. Patterson Hall was elected president and the first meeting of the General Board was held in Winnipeg.

Initially the work of the W.A. included mission education among Girls; Juniors and Little Helpers (Babies) branches; support of women working as missionaries and assistants in Japan (later China and India) and on Indian Reserves; Dorcas work and financial support for the education of missionaries children. A pension fund for women missionaries was established in 1910. In 1912 after several years of discussion the W.A. agreed to assume responsibility for work with women and children overseas. This included additional budgeted expenditures for evangelism, schools and hospitals. This agreement was extended to the Canadian mission field in 1919.

In 1928 the general meeting became annual. Recognizing an expanded social service role in 1931 the W.A. added a clause to its Constitution governing its cooperation with the General Board of Religious Education (GBRE) and the Council for Social Service (CSS).

In 1966 the constitution was amended and the Woman’s Auxiliary became the Anglican Church Women (ACW). Integration with General Synod was agreed as a national goal and took place in 1973. Since that time the organization exists by choice at the diocesan and parish levels.

According to E. M. Malone and Major T. E. Mcnutt, The Church in the Island Province (1932), p. 118, the first branch of the Women's Auxiliary in the Maritimes was established in 1897 at St. Peter's Cathedral.

As noted in the Anglican Church Women archives, the Prince Edward Island branch of the Anglican Church Women was dissolved in June 2017. Since then St. Peter's Cathedral has maintained the Binney Group and Inglis Group as active women's groups within the church.

Lawrence W. Watson

  • Canada
  • Person
  • 2 May 1860-17 July 1925

Lawrence Watson was born Laurence White Watson on 2 May 1860 on Queen Street, Charlottetown, and baptised at St. James Church in Charlottetown on 11 July 1860. His father was William R. Watson and his mother Sarah Ann Watson (nee Sarah Ann Croskill). (The official baptismal record shows his name as Laurence but the spelling changed from Laurence to Lawrence at some point.) Watson dies in Charlottetown on 17 July 1925, age 65. According to the obituary in The Charlottetown Guardian newspaper on 29 July 1925, Watson received his B.A. at King's College, Windsor, Nova Scotia, and then studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. He ended his medical studies on the death of his father and returned to Prince Edward Island to continue his father's business.

Watson directed musical services at St. Peter's Cathedral Church for many years, and carried out numerous other duties for the church.

Watson composed the music for The Island Hymn, with lyrics by Lucy M. Montgomery.

Watson was married to Eleanor Massey Desbrisay. According to census records he had two children, Ruth (born ca. 1893) and Norman (born ca. 1899), but The Charlottetown Guardian newspaper indicates he had a daughter and two sons.

Bishop Hibbert Binney

  • Canada
  • Person
  • 1819-1887

The following is adapted from the Wikipedia entry for Herbert Binney, which is an abbreviated version of the Dictionary of Canadian Biography entry. Hibbert Binney (12 August 1819 – 30 April 1887) was a Canadian Church of England bishop. He was the fourth Bishop of Nova Scotia from 1851 to 1887. Born in Sydney, Nova Scotia, the son of the Reverend Hibbert Binney and Henrietta Amelia Stout, Hibbert Binney Sr. was the rector of St George’s Church in Sydney. In 1823, Binney Sr. returned to England with his family to become rector of Newbury, Berkshire. Binney Jr. was educated at King's College London, and received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Worcester College, Oxford, in 1842. He was ordained deacon by the Bishop of Oxford Richard Bagot in 1842 and was appointed a fellow of Worcester College. In 1844, he received his Master of Arts and was appointed tutor in 1846. In 1848, he became bursar of Worcester College.In 1851, Binney was named Bishop of Nova Scotia and was consecrated in London by Archbishop John Bird Sumner of Canterbury and assisted by Bishops Blomfield of London, Wilberforce of Oxford, and Gilbert of Chichester. He was married to Mary Bliss (1829–1903), the daughter of William Blowers Bliss and Sarah Ann Anderson. Binney lived for years in what is now known as the Black-Binney House, which is now a national historic site.

George Filliter

  • Canada
  • Person
  • 1912-2007

The following biographical information comes from the obituary for George Richard Forsyth Filliter (known as Dick), published in the Telegraph Journal in 2007. (See http://www.inmemoriam.ca/view-announcement-137137-george-richard-forsyth-dick-filliter.html.)

FILLITER, GEORGE RICHARD FORSYTH (DICK), M.B.E. - Passed away peacefully at Camp Hill Hospital, Halifax on April 7th, 2007. Dick was born September 10th, 1912, the eldest son of George and Julia Blanche (Hall) Filliter. He was predeceased by his parents and brothers John and David and is survived by his wife Helen (Baldwin), sons John (Clevie Wall), Bruce (Yvonne Raczkowski) and Jim (Paula MacDonald), grandchildren Jillian (Anthony Bell), Jennifer, Daniel, Carolyn and Christopher, and his brother Brian (Barbara). Dick attended public schools in Woodstock, N.B. and Charlottetown, P.E.I. He was involved in the Boy Scout movement from an early age, became a King Scout, represented P.E.I. at the 1929 World Jamboree, and served as a Cubmaster and Boy Scout Leader for over 25 years. After completing high school, he joined the Bank of Montreal and took courses through Queen's University to become a Fellow of the Canadian Banker's Association. In April 1940 Dick enlisted with the Prince Edward Island Highlanders; he served on coastal defence duty in the Halifax area, trained at infantry headquarters in England, served in the liberation of Holland, was promoted to the rank of major, mentioned in despatches and awarded an M.B.E. Except for his service with the Canadian Army from 1940 to 1945, Dick was employed all his working life by the Bank of Montreal; he was manager of the last two branches where he worked, at Yarmouth, N.S. and 226 Union Street, Saint John, N.B. Following his retirement in 1974, he did some auditing for the bank and also served as Director of Anglicans in Mission for the Diocese of Fredericton from 1981 to 1987. Dick served as a Vestryman and Warden of St. Paul's Church in Rothesay, N.B., was made an Honorary Life Member of the Canadian Cancer Society and a Life Member of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. He was a regular blood donor and a Dominion Marksman. Dick was an avid sportsman, winning a Gorsebrook Golf Club Tournament, skipping an 8-end while curling in Yarmouth, and winning a Maritime Badminton Championship in men's doubles with Stan Goodwin in 1936 and a senior men's doubles title with Phil Ritcey in 1971. He organized badminton and tennis clubs, enjoyed competing at cards (especially duplicate bridge), and took a keen interest in photography and wildflowers. While in Saint John, Dick belonged to the Union Club, the Kiwanis Club, the Thistle Curling Club and East Riverside Golf and Country Club. A Memorial Service for Dick was held at St. Luke's Anglican Church, Dartmouth on April 11th.

Walter Aidan Cotton

  • Canada
  • Person
  • c. 1878-1960

The following biographical sketch is taken from the authority record prepared by the Borthwick Institute for Archives at the University of York, UK, at https://borthcat.york.ac.uk/index.php/cotton-walter-aidan-c-1878-1960-clergyman-missionary.

Walter Aidan Cotton was born 13 March c. 1878 in Canada. He was educated at King's College in Windsor, Nova Scotia and was ordained deacon in 1902 and priest in 1903. Cotton began keeping a diary in 1893 while he was still at high school, and this practice continued, with some gaps, until 1960.

In 1907 Cotton moved to England to take up the curacy of St Michael's in Croydon. In 1908 he resigned his position to take up permanent residence at the Community of the Resurrection in Mirfield, an Anglican religious order for men founded in 1892.

In 1911 he joined the Community's South African Mission and was based in Johannesburg, becoming Prior of the suburb of Rosettenville in 1915 and principal of St Peter's Theological College there in 1917. In 1924 Cotton became Prior of Penhalonga, in Southern Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe.

Cotton remained at Penhalonga for five years but felt increasingly isolated and later returned to Johannesburg and resumed his position as Prior of Rosettenville. In 1942 he left Johannesburg to work at Jane Furse Hospital in Sekhuniland.

Whilst in South Africa, Cotton wrote several books and pamphlets addressing race. In 1926 he published 'The Race Problem in South Africa,' in 1931 he followed this with 'Racial Segregation in South Africa,' and in 1945 he published the 'Sepeli Prayer Book.' His works advocated complete territorial segregation for whites and black Africans whilst approving of 'occasional mixed marriages' as a bridge between the races.

He also produced a number of unpublished theological works, including 'Priesthood and the Reformation,' and 'The Sublimation of Life in God's Sacramental Universe.'

In 1946 he returned to Mirfield. Dissatisfied with the Community, Cotton disputed the practice of private masses and criticised the Community's work in South Africa. In 1952 his strong views led him to attempt to establish a new community in his native Canada called the Society of the Servants of the Church. The Society was unsuccessful and in 1954 Cotton returned to Mirfield.

Walter Aidan Cotton died at Mirfield in February 1960.

Mothers' Union -- Prince Edward Island Chapter

  • Canada
  • Corporate body
  • 1982-1995

The Mothers’ Union was founded in England in 1876 by Mary Sumner, who wanted to create an organization for women that built a network of rich and poor to support mothers to raise their children in Christian faith. By 1909, the Mothers’ Union had become the largest voluntary women’s organization in Britain. In 1952, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II granted her royal patronage to the Mothers’ Union. In 1996, some 125 members of the Mothers’ Union became priests in the Church of England, following the Synod’s approval of the ordination of women.

The Prince Edward Island chapter of the Mothers’ Union was formed in March 1982. Among the activities undertaken by the local group included: hosting pancake breakfasts on the first day of Sunday School in early September; baking simnel cakes (a form of fruitcake) as part of Mothering Sunday; participating in the annual Christmas pageant; stitching needlepoint covers for church kneelers; organizing “Winter Games” events (evening gatherings of parishioners and others to play card games and board games in the church hall in winter); and holdings prayer sessions and meetings for members. The Mothers’ Union also provided support for refugees and newcomers to the Island and created a “link letters” activity comparable to “pen pals”. An Island-wide renewal meeting was held in November 1988. A major project for the Prince Edward Island chapter was the creation of a Mothers’ Union banner, which was unveiled on 24 May 1992. The banner still hangs in the church, as of 2020. Mothers’ Union activities began to decline as the Binney Group and Inglis Group became more active, eventually ceasing operations around 1995.

George W. Hodgson

  • Canada PEI SPCA
  • Person
  • 15 January 1842 - 20 July 1885

George Wright Hodgson was born in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, on 15 January 1842, the son of Daniel Hodgson and Mary Cambridge Wright and younger brother of Edward Jarvis Hodgson. George was baptized on 24 August 1842 in St. Paul's Anglican Church in Charlottetown.

George studied at King's College in Windsor, Nova Scotia, becoming a firm supporter of the Anglo-Catholic Oxford Movement. He was the first Reverend of St. Peter's Cathedral, in Charlottetown, in 1869; the church had been built in 1867 and held its first service, under his direction, in 1869.

George married Gertrude Magdalene DesBrisay on 4 March 1884. He died on 20 July 1885 at the age of 43 and is buried at the St. Peter's churchyard in Charlottetown.

James Simpson

  • Canada PEI SPCA
  • Person
  • 11 May 1853-29 November 1920

As outlined in Robert Tuck's entry for Simpson in the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, James Simpson was born on 11 May 1853 in Maidstone, England, the son of James Simpson, a surgeon and dentist, and Marion Campbell. Simpson married Alice Maude DesBrisay in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island on 29 June 1891 and had three sons and one daughter. Simpson died in Charlottetown on 29 November 1920. He was educated at Southsea Diocesan Grammar School in England and emigrated to Quebec in 1872. He studied for holy orders at Bishop’s College, Lennoxville, graduating in arts in 1876 (ma 1879) and then worked as a government surveyor. In 1882 he was engaged as assistant master at Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ontario, and was then ordered deacon in 1882 and priest in 1883.

In December 1886, Simpson went to Charlottetown to take temporary charge of St Peter’s Cathedral, being inducted as "priest-incumbent" on 13 February 1887. He was made the first canon of his cathedral in 1907 and an honorary canon of All Saints’ Cathedral, Halifax, in 1915. He was a member of both provincial and general synods, a governor of King’s College, Windsor, Nova Scotia, and a delegate to the Pan-Anglican Congress held in 1908. In 1914 Bishop’s College made him an honorary doctor of canon law. Simpson also served on the committee that produced the first Canadian revision of the Book of Common Prayer in 1918.

St. Peter's Cathedral Church

  • Canada PEI SPCA
  • Corporate body
  • 1867-

As noted on the St. Peter's Cathedral Church website, the founding of St. Peter's was directly linked to a theological and liturgical revival of the Catholic tradition within Anglicanism, known as the Oxford or Tractarian Movement. This Movement began in England in the 1830's, and spread throughout the Anglican Communion worldwide. By the 1860's, some parishioners of the already long-established St. Paul's Church, in Charlottetown, had been exposed to the Oxford Movement through their travels, and wanted to erect a new church building where the teachings and liturgical observances of that movement could be reflected and practiced.

As noted in Wikipedia, St. Peter's, located on Rochford Square, corner of All Souls' Lane and Rochford Street, Charlottetown, was designated a cathedral in 1879 by Bishop Hibbert Binney, the Bishop of Nova Scotia. Over the years, it has served as a second cathedral of the Anglican Diocese of Nova Scotia (now called Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island). (The principal cathedral of the diocese is All Saints' Cathedral in Halifax, Nova Scotia.) Attached to the west side of the cathedral is All Souls' Chapel, which was designated as a National Historic Site in 1990.

Land for the new church was made available by Mr. William Cundall, and construction began in 1867. By the spring of 1869, the building was completed, and Mr. Cundall then officially gave the land to the church on June 1, 1869. The opening services were held on June 13 of that year, but the Cathedral was not consecrated until the Feast of St. Peter, June 29, 1879. It was constructed in an area of the city known as West Bog. St. Peter's School was opened in 1872 the girls' school three years later. [[confirm when they closed]]

Following Oxford Movement traditions, choir members have worn surplices since the opening of the church. As early as 1872 the Rood Screen was erected and the seven hanging lamps placed in the sanctuary. The envelope system was adopted in 1876, and the pews have always been free. Altar candles have been used since 1877, and Eucharistic vestments since 1889. Originally, chairs were used at St. Peter's. In 1928, these were replaced by pews of dark walnut-coloured Douglas fir. The pulpit is the design of William Critchlow Harris, the brother of Robert Harris the artist, whose paintings beautify All Souls' Chapel. William Critchlow Harris was also the architect of All Souls' Chapel. The High Altar (complete with an Altar Stone) is still in its traditional position. Behind the Altar are statues of the Lord and four evangelists (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John).

The first priest incumbent was Reverend George W. Hodgson, who served from 1869 to 1885. After Reverend Hodgson's death, Father Armstrong from Toronto and Father Smythe from the West Indies acted on an interim basis until Canon James Simpson was appointed the second Priest Incumbent in 1886 [[1887?]], serving until his death in 1920. A former master at Port Hope School, Canon Simpson had as his assistant the Reverend Thomas Henry Hunt. Canon Simpson, along with Mr. William Critchlow Harris (architect) and Mr. Robert Harris, C.M.G. (artist), were largely responsible for the creation of All Souls' Chapel.

Canon Elwyn Mortimer Malone, originally from Antigua, followed Canon Simpson, serving from 1921 to 1952. It was during his tenure of office that the property ceased to be vested in Trustees and was turned over to the Rector, Wardens, and Vestry.

In 1952 Canon Gerald E. Moffatt became Rector of the Cathedral, serving until 1958. Archdeacon J. R. Davies became Rector in 1958 and remained until 1967. Archdeacon G. S. Tanton, the second Islander to serve at St. Peter's after George Hodgson, became Rector in 1967, retiring in 1975. [[1974 or 1975?]]

In 1974, Canon H. M. D. Westin became the seventh Parish Priest and served until his retirement in October 1990. Aside from his spiritual and pastoral work as a dedicated priest, he is remembered for his founding of what is now the annual Atlantic Theological Conference, which continues to be held annually. To publish the proceedings of these conferences, St. Peter Publications was established in [[year]]. It publishes a book containing the papers presented at the previous year's theological conference, as well as "A Canadian Church Calendar", Common Prayer Commentaries, a Sunday School curriculum, and numerous books, pamphlets and tracts. For a number of years, St. Peter Publications also produced a quarterly periodical, The Anglican Free Press.

The next Rector, The Reverend Canon Peter Harris, from Nova Scotia, served for almost two years as Assistant Priest, starting in April 1989, before being appointed Rector at the end of 1990, continuing to the end of November 2014. The Reverend David Garrett succeeded Canon Harris as Rector in December 2014.

A new parish hall attached to the cathedral was erected in 2004, replacing an older hall that had stood on that site for over 100 years.

Edward Jarvis Hodgson

  • Canada PEI SPCA
  • Person
  • 29 July 1840-1911

Edward Jarvis Hodgson was born in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, 29 July 1840. After studying law, he became a barrister in 1862 and was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1879. He completed work for the Prince Edward Island railway and other federal government departments between 1882 and approximately 1889. From 1891 until 1910, he was Master of the Rolls and an Assistant Judge of the Supreme Court of Judicature of Prince Edward Island, and from 1896 until his death in 1911, Chancellor of King's College University.

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